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Kenya
Saruni Samburu - Samburu National Park
Tents Rating
Tent rating
Retreat Setting
Camps & Lodges
Servies & Activities
Private Airstrip - Walking/Trekking - Swimming Pool
Eco Luxury retreats general information
4 Rooms | Children: yes

Perched on the top of the Kalama mountains with an all-round view of Northern Kenya all the way to snow-covered Mount Kenya, Saruni Samburu is a design lodge that is introducing a fresh safari concept in a well-known destination. Built on the pristine land owned by the Kalama Wildlife Conservancy in 240,000 acres-large Gir Gir Group Ranch, it is only 4 miles away from the Northern border of Samburu National Reserve, a celebrated elephant sanctuary. There are four houses (two of them are large family villas with two separate bedrooms and two bathrooms each), a swimming pool with dramatic view over Samburuland and a waterhole that attracts elephants, reticulated giraffes, zebras, oryxs and the other species that make Kalama so special.

Retreat Projects

Ecosystem

The Samburu ecosystem is o¬ne of the most exciting in East Africa. Famous for its large population of elephants, Samburu stands out for the abundance of northern species that can’t be found in other areas of Kenya. Samburu is managed by the Northern Rangeland Trust, an organization developed by Lewa Wildlife Conservancy to promote tourism and conservation.

Conservation

The Kalama rangers have been protecting this area for several years and have been reporting a rapid increase in wildlife. The waterholes built by Saruni and by the Kalama community, with water coming from Buffalo Springs, are bringing to the area a precious element that is often missing. The constant availability of water is making the Saruni area an unavoidable stopping point for all the wildlife.

Eco-tourism

Saruni Samburu works together with the Northern Rangeland Trust to improve the life conditions for the 2,000 people who own the Kalama Conservation Area, and is providing them with part of the income generated by tourism. The majority of the staff is employed from this small and poor community; the Lodge, moreover, has been built to achieve minimum impact on the environment